Tagged: Paradis 6

The Slowness of Paradis 6

Paradis 6 Cover

Over the past year or more I have heard and read so much about Paradis, the brainchild of French art director Thomas Lenthal,  but for some reason or another I never got about to ordering a copy – it remained in the back of my mind until I stumbled across this copy a few weeks ago and could no longer resist. For whatever reason – maybe the amount of references I had read, I had a relatively defined image in my mind of what the volume would contain, but the contents were actually quite different than I initially anticipated.

Launched in 2006, the latest issue of Paradis is 400-pages thick and has been nearly two years in the making. This issue includes lengthy features from cultural heavy-weights such as Chuck Close, Cindy Sherman, Massimo Vignelli, Juergen Teller and Alain de Botton.

“What I am looking at” by Juergen Teller in Paradis 6

“What I am looking at” by Juergen Teller in Paradis 6

“The Dennis Freedman Collection” in Paradis 6

A shining gem in the issue is a piece on the furniture collection of Dennis Freedman, sprawling over 20 spreads and packed with a dense landscape of one-off furniture pieces and artwork. The photographs relate well to the contents of the whole Paradis issue — an assortment of mysteries and beauties, from famous to unknown.

“I’ve always felt that inspiration is for amateurs. The rest of us just show up and get to work.” by Chuck Close and Hans Ulrich Obrist and Julia Peyton-Jones in Paradis 6

The two features on Chuck Close and Cindy Sherman border on dry, but a lengthy interview with a personal hero of mine, Massimo Vignelli, (interviewed by my amazing wife here) is a goldmine.

“In those days, the idea was that you should be able to design everything from a spoon to a city.” with Massimo Vignelli by Aaron Betsky in Paradis 6

“In those days, the idea was that you should be able to design everything from a spoon to a city.” with Massimo Vignelli by Aaron Betsky in Paradis 6

Paradis is worth a read – and I will definitely revisit it in the future (hopefully it doesn’t take 2 years for the next issue!). The features are the real drivers of the magazine, and there is lots to be said for curating such a high caliber team for a single issue. In a market awash with magazines overflowing with content, Paradis is a breath of fresh air due to its relative “slowness”. Spending time with Paradis is more akin to meandering through a quiet museum than flicking through a periodical.